Jun
5
7:30 PM19:30

New York Premiere of PANKE

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PANKE
(Alejo Franzetti, Argentina, 46 min. In Bissa, German, French with English subtitles)

New York Premiere
Q&A with filmmaker

Panke is an ode to survival; a very careful meditation on the melancholy of immigrants, made with a tone at once convincing and detached. The main character has nothing but the memories of his mother in Burkina Faso and his recently deceased brother. His brother, however, despite his death, demands attention. The body needs to be recognized before the authorities of an unknown city, the necessary papers need to be taken care of, as do the arrangements to return the body to Burkina Faso: a whole prosaic annex of death with rules that become urgent amidst the mourning. Focusing almost entirely on one character, this singular film reflects on the experience of displacement, as the protagonist sets out on a trip by foot towards an unlikely resolution of his tribulations.” –BAFICI

Tuesday, June 5, 7:30pm

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Jun
8
to Jun 21

U.S. Theatrical Release of EN EL SÉPTIMO DÍA

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En el Séptimo Día (On the Seventh Day) is a fiction feature from director Jim McKay (Girls Town, Our Song, Everyday People) which follows a group of undocumented immigrants living in Sunset Park, Brooklyn over the course of seven days. 

Bicycle delivery guys, construction workers, dishwashers, deli workers, and cotton candy vendors, they work long hours six days a week and then savor their day of rest on Sundays on the soccer fields of Sunset Park. José, a bicycle delivery worker, is the team's captain - young, talented, hardworking and responsible. When José's team makes it to the finals, he and his teammates are thrilled. But his boss throws a wrench into the celebration when he tells José he has to work on Sunday, the day of the finals. José tries to reason with his boss or replace himself, but his efforts fail. If he doesn't work on Sunday, his job and his future will be on the line. But if he doesn't stand up for himself and his teammates, his dignity will be crushed. 

Shot in the neighborhoods of Sunset Park, Park Slope, and Gowanus, En el Séptimo Día is a humane, sensitive, and humorous window into a world rarely seen. The film’s impact is made quietly, with restraint and respect for the individual experiences, everyday challenges, and small triumphs of its characters. 

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Jun
14
to Jun 19

Latin American Films at the Human Rights Watch Film Festival

WOMEN OF THE VENEZUELAN CHAOS
(Margarita Cadenas, Venezuela/France, 2017, 83 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)

Embodying strength and stoicism, five Venezuelan women from diverse backgrounds each draw a portrait of their country as it suffers under the worst crisis in its history amid extreme food and medicine shortages, a broken justice system, and widespread fear. The women share what life is really like for them and their families as the truth of the country’s difficulties are repeatedly denied by the government. Featuring stunning visuals and creative soundscapes, Women of the Venezuelan Chaos presents a uniquely beautiful country and people, who remain resilient and resourceful despite the immense challenges they face.

Friday, June 15, 9:15pm — IFC Center
Screening followed by discussion with filmmaker Margarita Cadenas and Tamara Taraciuk Broner, Senior Americas Researcher, HRW

Saturday, June 16, 3:30pm — Film Society of Lincoln Center
Screening followed by discussion with filmmaker Margarita Cadenas and Tamara Taraciuk Broner, Senior Americas Researcher, HRW
 

 

VOICES OF THE SEA
(Kim Hopkins, USA/Cuba, 2018, 99 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)

In this tiny, remote Cuban fishing village, Mariela, a mother of four young children, longs for a better life. The families in her village are utterly dependent on the day’s catch, which changes with the tide. The shops are empty, school is repeatedly shut down due to a lack of resources, and basic transportation is non-existent. With the relationship between the US and Cuba in flux, Mariela, like many Cubans, is afraid that her only chance to escape to the US will soon close. Her husband, Pita, loves his community, cherishes his friendships, and is loyal to his craft as a fisherman. The tension between husband and wife—one desperate to leave, the other content to stay—builds further after her brother and neighbors flee the country, risking their lives to chase the American Dream.

June 15, 6:30pm — Film Society of Lincoln Center
Screening followed by discussion with filmmaker Kim Hopkins

June 17, 8:45pm — IFC Center
Screening followed by discussion with filmmaker Kim Hopkins

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Jun
22
to Jun 28

NYC Theatrical Release of Brazilian Film ARABY

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ARABY
(João Dumans and Affonso Uchûo, Brazil, 2017, 98 min. In Portuguese with English subtitles)

A favorite in over 50 international film festivals, including New Directors/New Films and Rotterdam, Araby is an epistolary ode to labor, love, and storytelling. Winner of numerous awards—including the Cinema Tropical Award for best Latin American film of the year—Araby is a stirring glimpse into the exciting revitalized cinema from Brazil.

Andre, a teenager, lives in an industrial town in the southern state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, near an old aluminum factory. One day, a factory worker, Cristiano, suffers an accident. Asked to go to Cristiano’s house to pick up clothes and documents, Andre stumbles on a notebook, and it’s here that Araby begins — or, rather, transforms.

As Andre reads from the journal entries, we are plunged into Cristiano’s life, into stories of his wanderings, adventures, and loves. Beautifully written and filmed, Araby is a fable-like and lyrical road movie about a young man who sets off on a ten-year journey in search of a better life.

"An instant classic. Marked by boundless humanism."
—Neil Young, The Hollywood Reporter

“Opens quietly but builds with tremendous emotional force.”
—Manohla Dargis, The New York Times

Opens Friday, June 22
Film Society of Lincoln Center
144 West 65th Street, New York City

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Jun
30
to Jul 1

Seattle Premiere of Natalia Almada's EVERYTHING ELSE

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EVERYTHING ELSE
A film by Natalia Almada
(Todo lo demás, Mexico/USA, 98 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)

Selected as one of the best films of the year (Amy Taubin, Artforum), and winner of the Golden Gate Award for Best Film at the San Francisco Film Festival, Everything Else stars Academy Award–nominated actress Adriana Barraza (Amores PerrosBabel) as Doña Flor, a 63-year-old bureaucrat living in Mexico City, who has worked in the same government office for 35 years. When she loses the only living creature she cares for, she goes into crisis. 

With a keen directorial eye, impeccable framing, Natalia Almada's debut fiction film explores the interior life of Doña Flor as she awakens from her bureaucratic malaise and yearns to become visible again. Inspired by Hannah Arendt’s idea that bureaucratic dehumanization is a brutal form of violence, the story ultimately becomes a mesmerizing contemplation on solitude.

 
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Jul
6
4:00 PM16:00

Special Screening of BADI at Guild Hall

BADI
A film by Edu Felistoque
(Brazil, 2017, 85 min. In Portuguese with English subtitles)

The documentary Badi observes the personal trajectory and the international career of singer, guitarist, and composer Badi Assad. From classical to pop, the film follows Badi and her guitar as they move through the global music scene, facing challenges and her own creative boundaries, with lightness – including the pressures of belonging to a family of virtuoso musicians. Guest appearances by the Assad brothers, Larry Coryell, Toquinho, Naná Vasconcelos, Seu Jorge, and other great names of Brazilian and International music.

Preceded by History of Electric Guitar (5 min.)
G.E. Smith performs the history of the electric guitar, from steel to squeal, in just one song!

Presented as part of the first annual Guitar Masters festival.

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May
19
5:45 PM17:45

Brazilian Film RUNNING AFTER at the New York African Film Festival

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RUNNING AFTER
(Correndo atrás, Jeferson De, Brazil, 2018, 86 min. In Portuguese with English subtitles)

New York Premiere
Q&A with director Jeferson De

Eking out a living selling trinkets amidst the traffic-clogged streets of Rio de Janeiro, Paulo Gale sees an opportunity to change his life by becoming a football manager. While searching for his own Neymar in Rio’s suburbs, he discovers the remarkably talented Glanderson, a boy who dreams of becoming a professional soccer player despite the fact that he has only three toes on his right foot. Gale uses his entrepreneurial spirit and creativity to try and make Glanderson a star. A film of comic verve, Running After offers a glimpse of life on the peripheries of Brazil’s capital.

Co-presented with Cinema Tropical.

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May
4
to May 16

U.S. Theatrical Release of THE DESERT BRIDE

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A film by Cecilia Atán and Valeria Pivato
(Argentina/Chile, 2017, 78 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)

54-year-old Teresa has worked for decades as a live-in maid with a family in Buenos Aires. When the family sells the house, she is forced to take a job in the distant town of San Juan. Although feeling uncomfortable with traveling, she embarks on a journey through the desert. During her first stop, in the land of the miraculous “Saint Correa”, she loses her bag with all her belongings. This unexpected incident leads her to cross paths with El Gringo, a traveling salesman and the only person who can help Teresa find her bag. What seemed like the end of her world will ultimately prove her salvation.

Now Playing!

 IFC Center
323 Sixth Avenue (at West 3rd Street)
(212) 924-7771 / Buy tickets in advance

Laemmle Royal Theatre
11523 Santa Monica Blvd., West Los Angeles, CA
(310) 478-3836 / Buy tickets in advance

Laemmle Playhouse 7
673 East Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, CA
(310) 478-3836 / Buy tickets in advance 

 

 
 
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May
3
7:30 PM19:30

New York Premiere of THE ABSENT STONE

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THE ABSENT STONE
by Sandra Rozental & Jesse Lerner
(La piedra ausente, Mexico/USA, 2013, 82 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)

New York Premiere!
Q&A with co-director Sandra Rozental

In 1964, the largest carved stone of the Americas was moved from the town of San Miguel Coatlinchan in the municipality of Texcoco to the National Anthropology Museum in Mexico City in an impressive feat of engineering. The extraction of the monolith, which represents the pre-Hispanic water deity, set off a rebellion in the town and led to the intervention of the army. Today, the enormous stone, now upright, is an urban monument; it has been transformed into one of the principal icons of Mexican national identity.

The inhabitants of Coatlinchan insist that the removal of the stone has caused droughts. Representations and replicas of the absent stone appear everywhere in Coatlinchan, where it resonates in the memories of the inhabitants. Using animations, archival materials, and contemporary encounters with the protagonists of the transport of the stone, Sandra Rozental and Jesse Lerner’s playful documentary film explores the relevance of the ruins of the past in the present day.

This screening is part of: If You Can Screen It There: Premiering Contemporary Latin American Cinema

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Apr
29
7:30 PM19:30

Special Screening of EL GENERAL

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EL GENERAL
(Natalia Almada, USA/Mexico, 2009, 83 min, In Spanish and English with English Subtitles)

Through the legacy that filmmaker Natalia Almada inherited as the great-granddaughter of Mexican president Plutarco Elias Calles (1924-1928), one of Mexico's most controversial revolutionary figures accused of having been a "Dictator" and "Nun-Burner", yet also acclaimed for having been the "father of modern Mexico," El General is a portrait of a family and a country under the shadow of the past. 

Winner of the Sundance Film Festival’s U.S. Directing Award for documentary, Almada brings to life audio recordings she inherited from her grandmother combined with haunting photographs, archival newsreels, and old Hollywood films, along with sweeping footage of modern-day Mexico City, and interviews with today’s working poor, in this visually stunning, stylistically innovative film.

Preceded by All Water Has a Perfect Memory (Mexico/US, 2001, 19min, English Subtitles)
A poignant experimental documentary that explores the effects of tragedy and remembrance on a bi-cultural family. 

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Apr
18
7:00 PM19:00

Special Screening of NELSON FREIRE

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(João Moreira Salles, Brazil, 2003, 102 min. In Portuguese with English subtitles)
With the presence of Nelson Freire.

Free Admission. Space is limited. Click here to RSVP

"In films such as Noticias de Uma Guerra Particular, Joao Moreira Salles has demonstrated a keen interest in examining the dark underbelly of Brazilian society. But in this, his most recent documentary, he turns his eye to an aspect of his country that merits celebration.

Nelson Freire is probably one of the best-kept secrets in the world of the piano. The international press has acclaimed him as one of the greatest pianists of our time, comparing him to legendary greats such as Sergei Rachmaninov, Alfred Cortot, Josef Hofmann, Arthur Rubinstein, and Glenn Gould. Despite many accolades and commendations, however, Freire has avoided the spotlight, focusing on developing himself musically. Salles explains that in doing the documentary he wished to explore the idea of pudor or the tremendous modesty that Freire manifests toward exhibiting himself as a celebrity.

The film eschews the usual interviews with friends and witnesses in favor of a direct cinema approach that lets Freire's modesty and candor shine through, eloquently and cinematically. Highlights include discussions of the revered pianists Guiomar Novaes and Martha Argerich, Freire's love for American jazz and Hollywood cinema of the 1940s, and an incredible letter that his father wrote him when Freire was eight. This is a moving portrait of the soul of a unique Brazilian musician. Watching it, one understands what it is to be—no, one feels oneself becoming—more fully human."  —Tribeca Film Festival

Nelson Freire will perform with the Grand Rapids Symphony at Carnegie Hall on Friday, April 20 at 8pm. Click here for more information and to purchase tickets.

 

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This series is programmed by Mary Jane Marcasiano.
Sponsored by the Consulate General of Brazil in New York with additional sponsorship from Brazilian Music Foundation, and Hélio Campos.

 
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Apr
13
to Apr 30

U.S. Theatrical Release of Lucrecia Martel's ZAMA

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ZAMA
(Lucrecia Martel, Argentina/Brazil/Spain, 2017, 115 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)

Zama, an officer of the Spanish Crown born in South America, waits for a letter from the King granting him a transfer from the town in which he is stagnating, to a better place. His situation is delicate. He must ensure that nothing overshadows his transfer. He is forced to accept submissively every task entrusted to him by successive Governors who come and go as he stays behind. The years go by and the letter from the King never arrives. When Zama notices everything is lost, he joins a party of soldiers that go after a dangerous bandit.

“Beautiful, hypnotic, mysterious and elliptical”
—Manohla Dargis, The New York Times

Opens Friday, April 13
Film Society of Lincoln Center and IFC Center in New York City
Gene Siskel Film Center in Chicago

 

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Apr
5
7:30 PM19:30

New York Premiere of MY LAST FAILURE

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MY LAST FAILURE
(Mi último fracaso, Cecilia Kang, Argentina, In Spanish with English subtitles, 2016, 61 min.)

NYC PREMIERE!

“There are many films piercing through Cecilia Kang’s first feature; there’s a film about a family (her sister, her mother, her aunt, her grandmother). There’s also one about being an Argentine woman of Korean descent visiting Korea. And another one about being a Korean woman who, at the same time, acts like someone from Buenos Aires. There’s family love, friendship, the small tragedies and the great ones, emancipation, heartbreak, creativity. And none of these storylines drives us to a feeling of drift; they are parts of a mosaic that is pieced together in the viewer’s head thanks to a solid, strongly emotional core: the life of the director, who, in a spontaneous and loving display of generosity, dedicates My Last Failure to (in this order) a teacher from childhood, her eternal friends, and her sister.” —Mar del Plata Film Festival.

This screening is part of: 'If You Can Screen It There: Premiering Contemporary Latin American Cinema'

 
 
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Mar
29
7:00 PM19:00

EUFROSINA'S REVOLUTION at UnionDocs

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EUFROSINA'S REVOLUTION
(La revolución de los alcatraces, Luciana Kaplan, Mexico, 2012, 96 min.)
Dir. Luciana Kaplan in attendance.

In 2007, Eufrosina Cruz Mendoza was elected President of Oaxaca's municipal council. Her position was denied because she was a woman. Instead of stopping her, this denial started her on an even bigger political career. The director doggedly follows Eufrosina as she attacks gender inequality and the lack of voting rights for women in her community, while being harassed by government leaders in every step of the way.

Preceded by Field of Vision short documentary The Vote by Mila Aung-Thwin and Van Royko (12 min.)

The Vote observes residents of the bustling city of Yangon in Myanmar as they navigate their first democratic election in over 50 years, with Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi as a second time contender. 

 

 
 
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Mar
26
7:15 PM19:15

New York Premiere of THE HIDDEN TIGER

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THE HIDDEN TIGER
(A Vizinhança do Tigre, Affonso Uchoa, Brazil 2014, 95 min. In Portuguese with English subtitles)

New York Premiere

Affonso Uchoa made a major critical splash on the festival circuit last spring with his award-winning film, Araby. However, Uchoa has been active as a filmmaker for the past eight years.

Made in 2014, The Hidden Tiger charts the lives of a group of young residents of Nacional, a neighborhood in the suburbs of the city of Contagem. Juninho, Menor, Neguinho, Adilson, and Eldo live their lives in dialectical fragments of joy and adversity. Some work in construction, others in drug trafficking; a few attend heavy metal concerts, others play with guns; they read, dance carioca funk, and deal with their families as they struggle with the demands of their daily lives. Music is a key element in Uchoa’s rigorously gentle mise-en-scène—in concert with his patient gaze, it helps to illuminate the faces and bodies of Uchoa’s protagonists. The camera captures and crystallizes moments of small beauty in a landscape of social and economic conflict.

“It is worth noting that, in contrast to the treatment given to pretentiously popular film programs on urban peripheries, here there is no place for demagogy. The film doesn't treat its dwellers as attractions for export, it is an exercise of admirable humanism, nurtured by the five years the director devoted to constructing this admirable fresco.” –André Ldc, Janela Magazine.

Monday, March 26, 7:15pm

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Sponsored by the Consulate General of Brazil in New York.

 
 
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Mar
24
7:30 PM19:30

Music + Film: Brazil Presents ME, MY FATHER AND THE CARIOCAS

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ME, MY FATHER AND THE CARIOCAS
(Eu, Meu Pai e Os Cariocas, Lúcia Veríssimo, 2017, Brazil, 112 min. In Portuguese with English subtitles)
Q&A with director Lúcia Veríssimo
Buy Tickets

Me, My Father and the Cariocas is a engaging and fascinating journey through 70 years of the history of Brazilian music. From the golden era of the Radio Nacional, through Bossa Nova, Tropicalia, Samba, MPB (Musica Popular Brasileira) and through these days, the film is a love letter to the cultural legacy of the South American country.

The film was conceived, directed, produced and narrated by the actress Lúcia Veríssimo—daughter of the maestro Severino Filho, founder of the influential vocal group Os Cariocas, launchers of the Bossa Nova movement—who had direct access to some of the who's who of Brazilian music, including artists, musicologists, writers, maestros, composers and historians.

Featuring a vast collection of photographs, clips from films and videos, and featuring over 100 songs, Me, My Father and the Cariocas narrates how historical facts had a major influence in the development of the exuberant Brazilian music scene, and it's a must see for any music lover.

 

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This series is programmed by Mary Jane Marcasiano. 
Sponsored by the Consulate General of Brazil in New York
with additional support from Brazilian Music Foundation
and Hélio Campos.

 

 

 
 
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Mar
21
to Mar 25

15th Edition of Tucson Cine Mexico

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March 21 - 25
Presented by the Hanson Film Institute
and Cinema Tropical

 

Established in Tucson by the UA Hanson Film Institute in 2004, Tucson Cine Mexico (TCM) is the longest-running festival of contemporary Mexican cinema in the United States, and has become a vital platform for the screening of Mexican films in this country. The festival is free and promoted bilingually, and regularly attracts a diverse audience. Since its inception, Tucson Cine Mexico has attracted more than 20,000 festival-goers and has been host to more than 40 filmmakers and industry professionals. In addition to the annual film lineup, which generally features a mix of award-winning contemporary films and documentaries, the festival encourages audience participation and education via post-screening Q&As and filmmaker panels. Tucson Cine Mexico takes place over 4-5 days each March, with occasional special event screenings at other times through the year.

 
 

  ETIQUETA NO RIGUROSA / NO DRESS CODE REQUIRED  (Cristina Herrera Bórquez, Mexico, 2017, 92 min. In Spanish with English subtitles. Arizona Premiere)  Presented with support from the UA Institute for LGBT Studies. Q&A with director Cristina Herrera Bórquez.   Director Cristina Herrera Bórquez’s memorable documentary follows an unassuming same-sex couple, Víctor and Fernando, as they fight for the right to be married in their hometown of Mexicali, Baja California. As their struggle gets complicated and their case becomes public—winning them both allies and enemies—they become improbable media cause célèbres. With the filmmaker’s remarkable access to the epic story,  No Dress Code Required  is a rallying cry for equality, and a testament to the power of ordinary people to become agents of change.   Wednesday, March 21, 6:15pm — Center for Creative Photography    

ETIQUETA NO RIGUROSA / NO DRESS CODE REQUIRED
(Cristina Herrera Bórquez, Mexico, 2017, 92 min. In Spanish with English subtitles. Arizona Premiere)
Presented with support from the UA Institute for LGBT Studies.
Q&A with director Cristina Herrera Bórquez.

Director Cristina Herrera Bórquez’s memorable documentary follows an unassuming same-sex couple, Víctor and Fernando, as they fight for the right to be married in their hometown of Mexicali, Baja California. As their struggle gets complicated and their case becomes public—winning them both allies and enemies—they become improbable media cause célèbres. With the filmmaker’s remarkable access to the epic story, No Dress Code Required is a rallying cry for equality, and a testament to the power of ordinary people to become agents of change.

Wednesday, March 21, 6:15pm — Center for Creative Photography

 

  SANTO CONTRA CEREBRO DEL MAL / SANTO VS. THE EVIL BRAIN  (Joselito Rodríguez, Mexico/Cuba, 1961 (original production year), 2017 (restoration), 70 min. In Spanish with English subtitles) Starring: Rodolfo Guzmán "El Santo."  In person: Filmmaker/Archivist Viviana Garcia Besné.   Filmed in Cuba in 1961,  Santo contre cerebro del mal  is the first lucha libre film starring El Santo (Rodolfo Guzmán Huerta), the most iconic of all Mexican luchadores. In this film, the silver-masked hero foils the plot of a mad scientist to create a zombie army by zapping his innocent victims with electric shocks.  Cerebro del mal  sparked a long series of films – 52 in all – in which El Santo fights supernatural creatures, evil scientists, and various criminals and secret agents. Cut to 2017: the rapidly deteriorating original camera negatives are saved by archivist and filmmaker (and the producer’s granddaughter) Viviana Garcia Besné. Her mission: to rescue, preserve and reinterpret this and other Mexican films that have been despised by critics but loved by audiences. With assistance from director and archivist Nicolas Winding Refn, The Academy Film Archive and Cinema Preservation Alliance, the result is a stunning new digital restoration of this cult favorite. Doors open at 5:45pm for a pre-show celebration with DJ Dirtyverbs and Adam Cooper-Terán of Verbo•bala .     Thursday, March 22, 6:30pm — Fox Tucson Theatre    

SANTO CONTRA CEREBRO DEL MAL / SANTO VS. THE EVIL BRAIN
(Joselito Rodríguez, Mexico/Cuba, 1961 (original production year), 2017 (restoration), 70 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)
Starring: Rodolfo Guzmán "El Santo."
In person: Filmmaker/Archivist Viviana Garcia Besné.

Filmed in Cuba in 1961, Santo contre cerebro del mal is the first lucha libre film starring El Santo (Rodolfo Guzmán Huerta), the most iconic of all Mexican luchadores. In this film, the silver-masked hero foils the plot of a mad scientist to create a zombie army by zapping his innocent victims with electric shocks. Cerebro del mal sparked a long series of films – 52 in all – in which El Santo fights supernatural creatures, evil scientists, and various criminals and secret agents. Cut to 2017: the rapidly deteriorating original camera negatives are saved by archivist and filmmaker (and the producer’s granddaughter) Viviana Garcia Besné. Her mission: to rescue, preserve and reinterpret this and other Mexican films that have been despised by critics but loved by audiences. With assistance from director and archivist Nicolas Winding Refn, The Academy Film Archive and Cinema Preservation Alliance, the result is a stunning new digital restoration of this cult favorite. Doors open at 5:45pm for a pre-show celebration with DJ Dirtyverbs and Adam Cooper-Terán of Verbo•bala

Thursday, March 22, 6:30pm — Fox Tucson Theatre

 

  LOS ADIOSES / THE ETERNAL FEMININE  (Natalia Beristaín, Mexico, 2017, 85 min. In Spanish with English subtitles. Arizona Premiere) Cast: Karina Gidi, Daniel Giménez Cacho, Tessa Ia, Pedro De Tavira.  Q&A with director Natalia Beristáin.   Boasting outstanding performances by Karina Gidi and Daniel Giménez Cacho, Natalia Beristáin’s second feature film is an unconventional biopic about the late Rosario Castellanos, one of Mexico’s top literary voices of the twentieth century. The film picks up her life in the 1950s when, as an introverted university student in Mexico City, she fights to have her voice heard in a society run by men. Winner of the Audience Award at the 2017 Morelia International Film Festival.    Friday, March 23, 6:30pm — Harkins Tucson Spectrum 18    

LOS ADIOSES / THE ETERNAL FEMININE
(Natalia Beristaín, Mexico, 2017, 85 min. In Spanish with English subtitles. Arizona Premiere)
Cast: Karina Gidi, Daniel Giménez Cacho, Tessa Ia, Pedro De Tavira.
Q&A with director Natalia Beristáin.

Boasting outstanding performances by Karina Gidi and Daniel Giménez Cacho, Natalia Beristáin’s second feature film is an unconventional biopic about the late Rosario Castellanos, one of Mexico’s top literary voices of the twentieth century. The film picks up her life in the 1950s when, as an introverted university student in Mexico City, she fights to have her voice heard in a society run by men. Winner of the Audience Award at the 2017 Morelia International Film Festival. 

Friday, March 23, 6:30pm — Harkins Tucson Spectrum 18

 

  EL VIGILANTE / THE NIGHTGUARD  (Diego Ros, Mexico, 2016, 75 min. In Spanish with English subtitles. Arizona Premiere)  Q&A with director Diego Ros.   Salvador (Leonardo Alonso) works the night shift as a security guard in a construction site located on the outskirts of Mexico City. One evening, while the rest of the country celebrates a national holiday, Salvador repeatedly tries to leave the site in order to attend an important event, but a series of improbable situations turns the night into a bizarre and exhausting experience. The auspicious debut feature by Diego Ros is “a wonderfully atmospheric, slightly off-kilter piece through which evil gently and troublingly pulsates.” (Jonathan Holland,  The Hollywood Reporter ).   Friday, March 23, 9pm — Harkins Tucson Spectrum 18    

EL VIGILANTE / THE NIGHTGUARD
(Diego Ros, Mexico, 2016, 75 min. In Spanish with English subtitles. Arizona Premiere)
Q&A with director Diego Ros.

Salvador (Leonardo Alonso) works the night shift as a security guard in a construction site located on the outskirts of Mexico City. One evening, while the rest of the country celebrates a national holiday, Salvador repeatedly tries to leave the site in order to attend an important event, but a series of improbable situations turns the night into a bizarre and exhausting experience. The auspicious debut feature by Diego Ros is “a wonderfully atmospheric, slightly off-kilter piece through which evil gently and troublingly pulsates.” (Jonathan Holland, The Hollywood Reporter).

Friday, March 23, 9pm — Harkins Tucson Spectrum 18

 

  ME GUSTA PERO ME ASUSTA / I LIKE IT, BUT IT SCARES ME  (Beto Gómez, Mexico, 2017, 100 min. In Spanish with English subtitles. U.S. Premiere) Cast: Minnie West, Alejandro Speitzer, Joaquín Cosío, Silverio Palacios, Hector Kotsifakis.  Q&A with director Beto Gómez.   In this family-friendly box office hit from Mexico, Brayan Rodríguez, the innocent heir to a nouveau rich Sinaloa family, is sent to Mexico City to expand the mysterious family business. In the capital he meets Claudia, a spoiled millennial being pressured by her father to find a job, and their worlds collide. Appearances can be deceiving when hipster culture meets narco aesthetics in this deliciously subversive romantic screwball comedy starring Minnie West and Alejandro Speitzer in their charming feature film debuts, from director Beto Gómez ( Saving Private Perez ).   Saturday, March 24, 4pm — Harkins Tucson Spectrum 18    

ME GUSTA PERO ME ASUSTA / I LIKE IT, BUT IT SCARES ME
(Beto Gómez, Mexico, 2017, 100 min. In Spanish with English subtitles. U.S. Premiere)
Cast: Minnie West, Alejandro Speitzer, Joaquín Cosío, Silverio Palacios, Hector Kotsifakis.
Q&A with director Beto Gómez.

In this family-friendly box office hit from Mexico, Brayan Rodríguez, the innocent heir to a nouveau rich Sinaloa family, is sent to Mexico City to expand the mysterious family business. In the capital he meets Claudia, a spoiled millennial being pressured by her father to find a job, and their worlds collide. Appearances can be deceiving when hipster culture meets narco aesthetics in this deliciously subversive romantic screwball comedy starring Minnie West and Alejandro Speitzer in their charming feature film debuts, from director Beto Gómez (Saving Private Perez).

Saturday, March 24, 4pm — Harkins Tucson Spectrum 18

 

  TODO LO DEMÁS / EVERYTHING ELSE  (Natalia Almada, Mexico, 2016, 98 min. In Spanish with English subtitles. Arizona Premiere) Cast: Adriana Barraza.  Accomplished documentarian Natalia Almada (Sundance Documentary Directing Award 2009) makes her fiction debut with  Everything Else , starring Academy Award-nominated Adriana Barraza ( Amores Perros, Babel ). The film follows Doña Flor, a 63-year-old bureaucrat living in Mexico City who has worked in the same government office for 35 years, attending unsentimentally to people from all corners of Mexican society. When she loses the only living creature she cares for, she goes into crisis. With a keen directorial eye, impeccable framing, and inspired by Hannah Arendt’s idea that bureaucracy is one of the worst forms of violence, the story ultimately becomes a mesmerizing contemplation on solitude.   Saturday, March 24, 7pm — Harkins Tucson Spectrum 18    

TODO LO DEMÁS / EVERYTHING ELSE
(Natalia Almada, Mexico, 2016, 98 min. In Spanish with English subtitles. Arizona Premiere)
Cast: Adriana Barraza.

Accomplished documentarian Natalia Almada (Sundance Documentary Directing Award 2009) makes her fiction debut with Everything Else, starring Academy Award-nominated Adriana Barraza (Amores Perros, Babel). The film follows Doña Flor, a 63-year-old bureaucrat living in Mexico City who has worked in the same government office for 35 years, attending unsentimentally to people from all corners of Mexican society. When she loses the only living creature she cares for, she goes into crisis. With a keen directorial eye, impeccable framing, and inspired by Hannah Arendt’s idea that bureaucracy is one of the worst forms of violence, the story ultimately becomes a mesmerizing contemplation on solitude.

Saturday, March 24, 7pm — Harkins Tucson Spectrum 18

 

  TALK: THE SILENT GIANT - LATIN AMERICA, A MODERN-DAY EPICENTER OF FILM   With Carlos Gutiérrez, Director of Cinema Tropical   It’s been 20 years since the emergence of the ‘New Argentine Cinema,’ which fostered the arrival of a new generation of filmmakers like Lucrecia Martel ( La Ciénega ), which would drastically change local modes of production and narratives. The Argentine success served as inspiration for many other Latin American countries, creating an impressive artistic outburst, and breaking film production and box office records throughout the region. Yet, aside from a few break-through films like  City of God ,  Y Tu Mamá También  and  Amores Perros , Latin American cinema remains largely overlooked in the United States. Carlos Gutierrez, co-founding director of Cinema Tropical, the leading presenter of Latin American cinema in the U.S., will discuss the outstanding contemporary cinema coming from Latin America, and share exclusive trailers of upcoming films.   Sunday, March 25, 11:30am — Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block - Lobby    

TALK: THE SILENT GIANT - LATIN AMERICA, A MODERN-DAY EPICENTER OF FILM
With Carlos Gutiérrez, Director of Cinema Tropical

It’s been 20 years since the emergence of the ‘New Argentine Cinema,’ which fostered the arrival of a new generation of filmmakers like Lucrecia Martel (La Ciénega), which would drastically change local modes of production and narratives. The Argentine success served as inspiration for many other Latin American countries, creating an impressive artistic outburst, and breaking film production and box office records throughout the region. Yet, aside from a few break-through films like City of GodY Tu Mamá También and Amores Perros, Latin American cinema remains largely overlooked in the United States. Carlos Gutierrez, co-founding director of Cinema Tropical, the leading presenter of Latin American cinema in the U.S., will discuss the outstanding contemporary cinema coming from Latin America, and share exclusive trailers of upcoming films.

Sunday, March 25, 11:30am — Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block - Lobby

 

  TEMPESTAD  (Tatiana Huezo, Mexico, 2016, 105 min. In Spanish with English subtitles. Arizona Premiere)  Tatiana Huezo’s second documentary feature (after her acclaimed debut  The Tiniest Place ) recounts the story of two women: Miriam, who was wrongly accused of human trafficking and imprisoned in a jail controlled by a drug cartel, and Adela, a circus performer who has been looking for her kidnapped daughter for over a decade. Through a subjective and emotional journey, and with striking cinematography by Ernesto Pardo (nominated for an American Society of Cinematographers Award for his work on the film),  Tempestad  conveys the paralyzing power of fear and reflects the impact of the violence and impunity that afflict Mexico. Hailed as “a rich and original piece of work” ( IndieWire ),  Tempestad  was Mexico’s official entry to this year’s Oscars.  Post-screening discussion with Ana Cornide, Assistant Professor, UA Department of Spanish and Portuguese.    Sunday, March 25, 2pm — Harkins Tucson Spectrum 18

TEMPESTAD
(Tatiana Huezo, Mexico, 2016, 105 min. In Spanish with English subtitles. Arizona Premiere)

Tatiana Huezo’s second documentary feature (after her acclaimed debut The Tiniest Place) recounts the story of two women: Miriam, who was wrongly accused of human trafficking and imprisoned in a jail controlled by a drug cartel, and Adela, a circus performer who has been looking for her kidnapped daughter for over a decade. Through a subjective and emotional journey, and with striking cinematography by Ernesto Pardo (nominated for an American Society of Cinematographers Award for his work on the film), Tempestad conveys the paralyzing power of fear and reflects the impact of the violence and impunity that afflict Mexico. Hailed as “a rich and original piece of work” (IndieWire), Tempestad was Mexico’s official entry to this year’s Oscars. Post-screening discussion with Ana Cornide, Assistant Professor, UA Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Sunday, March 25, 2pm — Harkins Tucson Spectrum 18

 

Tucson Cine Mexico’s website www.tucsoncinemexico.org is the source for all festival event details and free tickets. 

Screening Information: The 2018 Tucson Cine Mexico screenings and talk will take place across four venues in Tucson including the Center for Creative Photography (1030 N Olive Rd, Tucson 85719), Fox Tucson Theatre, Harkins Tucson Spectrum 18 (5455 S Calle Santa Cruz, Tucson 85706), and the Tucson Museum of Art & Historic Block. Tickets are free and open to all. Advance tickets are now available at www.tucsoncinemexico.org. Note that tickets do not guarantee seats. Seating will be available to ticket holders on a first-come first-served basis. Patrons are encouraged to arrive early to secure seats. Subject to availability, some tickets may be available on the night.

About our sponsors: Tucson Cine Mexico 2018 acknowledges the support of the following sponsors.
Silver: Film Tucson, Topline Entertainment, Rio Nuevo, Arizona Office of Film & Digital Media. 
Bronze: La Estrella Bakery, UA College of Fine Arts, UA Department of Spanish & Portuguese, UA Office of Global Initiatives, SplitSeed Productions, Vantage West, Calle Tepa Mexican Street Grill, Guadalajara Original Grill.
WIth support from Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block, UA Institute for LGBT Studies, UA Center for Latin American Studies, UA College of Humanities, UA College of Social & Behavioral Sciences, UA Department of Gender & Women’s Studies, and Ambulante Gira de Documentales.

 

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Mar
8
7:00 PM19:00

NORA'S WILL at New York Sephardic Film Festival

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NORA'S WILL
(Cinco días sin Nora, Mexico, 2010, 90 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)

When his ex-wife Nora dies right before Passover, José is forced to stay with her body until she can be properly put to rest. He soon realizes he is part of Nora’s plan to bring her family back together for one last Passover feast, leading José to rediscover their undying love for each other. A comedy like no other, and directed by Mariana Chenillo, the first female director to win Mexico’s Best Picture Award.

 

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Feb
28
to Mar 4

3rd Annual Neighboring Scenes: New Latin American Cinema

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The third annual Neighboring Scenes, a 17-film showcase of contemporary Latin American cinema, co-presented with Cinema Tropical, is coming the Film Society of Lincoln Center, February 28-March 4.

Highlighting impressive recent productions from across the region, this selective slate of premieres exhibits the breadth of styles, techniques, and approaches employed by Latin American filmmakers today. Neighboring Scenes spans a wide geographic rang, featuring established auteurs as well as fresh talent from the international festival scene.

Opening night is the U.S. premiere of Anahí Berneri’s award-winning Alanis, an unflinching portrait of a young mother eking out a living as a prostitute in Buenos Aires. Unfolding over the course of three days, Berneri’s “quietly radical” (Variety) fifth film explores the challenges of urban life as an immigrant woman, and is anchored by Sofía Gala’s fearless performance. Closing out the weekend is the world premiere of a new restoration of Pizza, Beer, and Cigarettes (1998), celebrating its 20th anniversary. Bruno Stagnaro and Adrián Caetano’s landmark film, which follows a pair of less than talented thieves, launched the New Argentine Cinema movement and has continued inspiring Latin American filmmakers for generations.

Other highlights in this year’s lineup include such festival favorites as Niles Atallah’s formally daring Rey, which won the Special Jury Prize at Rotterdam; Santiago Mitre’s political thriller The Summit, an Un Certain Regard selection from Cannes, featuring an impressive international cast; and Fellipe Barbosa’s around-the-world travelogue Gabriel and the Mountain, a two-time prizewinner at Cannes Critics’ Week. The festival also features documentaries about Mexican fishermen, showgirls of the ’70s and ’80s, and the colonialist history of Easter Island; adaptations of Dostoevsky (António, One, Two, Three) and Hans Christian Andersen (The Little Match Girl); and a number of debut features including visual artist Adrián Villar Rojas’s The Theater of Disappearance, acinematic reimagining of his acclaimed Met rooftop installation.

Organized by Carlos A. Gutiérrez and Cecilia Barrionuevo. 

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Feb
26
7:15 PM19:15

New York Premiere of THE ROMANTIC BARBER

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THE ROMANTIC BARBER
(El peluquero romántico, Iván Ávila Dueñas, Mexico/Brazil, 2016, 98 min. In Spanish and Portuguese with English subtitles)

New York Premiere

Neighborhood barber Victor’s life is rather uneventful. He sticks to a strict daily routine at both work and home, where he spends his nights alongside his mother listening to boleros or watching movies from the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema on television. His routine is disrupted when his mother suddenly dies. His flirtation with a young waitress and his reunion with an old girlfriend can’t fill the void left behind by his mother. That changes, however, when a man claiming to be his father suddenly walks into the shop one day. The encounter will lead him to an unexpected and life-changing trip to Rio de Janeiro. The fifth feature by Mexican director Iván Ávila Dueñas, The Romantic Barber is a quirky and charming film about an anachronistic character in a vanishing environment. 

 
 
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Feb
15
to Feb 23

Latin American Films at MoMA's Doc Fortnight

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Doc Fortnight 2018: MoMA’s International Festival
of
Nonfiction Film and Media

February 15–26
The Museum of Modern Art

Latin American Films Presented by Cinema Tropical

Doc Fortnight, MoMA’s annual international festival of nonfiction film, returns for its 17th year with 12 days of innovative approaches to documentary filmmaking. Featuring a diverse assortment of features and short films from across the globe, the festival continues to highlight the vibrant and varied styles of independent filmmakers—both emerging and established—around the world.

 

  HABANEROS  (Julien Temple, Great Britain/Cuba, 2017, 126 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)  Opening night. U.S. premiere.   Acclaimed filmmaker Julien Temple celebrates the rich history of Cuba and its people in this homage to Havana. Weaving together archival footage, animations, movie excerpts, and interviews, and featuring a vibrant soundtrack of salsa, jazz, rumba, mambo, and hip hop, the film presents key moments in the city’s recent history—from the abolition of slavery at the end of the 19th century to the revolution of Fidel Castro—up to the current moment, with Havana on the brink of an exciting new global presence.   Thursday, February 15, 7:30pm    

HABANEROS
(Julien Temple, Great Britain/Cuba, 2017, 126 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)
Opening night. U.S. premiere.

Acclaimed filmmaker Julien Temple celebrates the rich history of Cuba and its people in this homage to Havana. Weaving together archival footage, animations, movie excerpts, and interviews, and featuring a vibrant soundtrack of salsa, jazz, rumba, mambo, and hip hop, the film presents key moments in the city’s recent history—from the abolition of slavery at the end of the 19th century to the revolution of Fidel Castro—up to the current moment, with Havana on the brink of an exciting new global presence.

Thursday, February 15, 7:30pm

 

  SEÑORITA MARÍA, LA FALDA DE LA MONTAÑA / MISS MARIA, SKIRTING THE MOUNTAIN  (Rubén Mendoza, Colombia, 2017, 90 min. In Spanish with English subtitles) U.S. premiere  Maria Luisa lives in a conservative Catholic village in rural Colombia. Designated male at birth and shunned by her family, she has found enough love in her God and in herself to keep her going despite it all. Preceded by   Where We Are Now   (Lucie Rachel, Great Britain, 2016, 9 min.)   Saturday, February 17, 1:30pm — Q&A with filmmaker    

SEÑORITA MARÍA, LA FALDA DE LA MONTAÑA / MISS MARIA, SKIRTING THE MOUNTAIN
(Rubén Mendoza, Colombia, 2017, 90 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)
U.S. premiere

Maria Luisa lives in a conservative Catholic village in rural Colombia. Designated male at birth and shunned by her family, she has found enough love in her God and in herself to keep her going despite it all. Preceded by Where We Are Now (Lucie Rachel, Great Britain, 2016, 9 min.)

Saturday, February 17, 1:30pm — Q&A with filmmaker

 

  LA LIBERTAD DEL DIABLO / DEVIL'S FREEDOM  (Everardo González, Mexico, 2017, 74 min. In Spanish with English subtitles).  Hidden behind matching beige masks, victims and perpetrators of violence in Mexico reflect on the gruesome events that have come to shape their everyday lives. Stripped of names and faces, individuals are separated by their emotional response and stitched together by their shared fears. Preceded by   Best of Luck with the Wall   (Josh Begley, USA, 2017, 6 min.)   Saturday, February 17, 7pm — Q&A with filmmaker    

LA LIBERTAD DEL DIABLO / DEVIL'S FREEDOM
(Everardo González, Mexico, 2017, 74 min. In Spanish with English subtitles).

Hidden behind matching beige masks, victims and perpetrators of violence in Mexico reflect on the gruesome events that have come to shape their everyday lives. Stripped of names and faces, individuals are separated by their emotional response and stitched together by their shared fears. Preceded by Best of Luck with the Wall (Josh Begley, USA, 2017, 6 min.)

Saturday, February 17, 7pm — Q&A with filmmaker

 

  RíO VERDE: EL TIEMPO DE LOS YAKURUNAS / GREEN RIVER: THE TIME OF THE YAKURUNAS ( Alvaro Sarmiento, Diego Sarmiento, Peru, 2017, 89 min. In Spanish; English subtitles.  U.S. premiere   This poetic journey into the depths of the Peruvian Amazon explores the perception of time in three small villages that live in close symbiosis with the river, a landscape inhabited by shamans and indigenous cultures that have been ravaged by the rubber industry.  Monday, February 19, 4pm   

RíO VERDE: EL TIEMPO DE LOS YAKURUNAS / GREEN RIVER: THE TIME OF THE YAKURUNAS (Alvaro Sarmiento, Diego Sarmiento, Peru, 2017, 89 min. In Spanish; English subtitles.
U.S. premiere

This poetic journey into the depths of the Peruvian Amazon explores the perception of time in three small villages that live in close symbiosis with the river, a landscape inhabited by shamans and indigenous cultures that have been ravaged by the rubber industry.

Monday, February 19, 4pm

 

  HÍBRIDOS, THE SPIRITS OF BRAZIL    ( Vincent Moon and Priscilla Telmo, Brazil/France, 2017)  This multi-platform project explores various forms of cinema, as well as various spiritual practices and trance forms around Brazil.  Híbridos  comprises four components: a feature-length film, a comprehensive open-source website, a multi-screen, site-specific installation, and a live cinema experience, in which the artists reconstruct the project from the source material in a dynamic presentation. Each form completes the other, in an attempt to question our relationship to images and to build an immersive, sensorial experience that evokes the trance state.   Monday, February 19, 7pm

HÍBRIDOS, THE SPIRITS OF BRAZIL
(Vincent Moon and Priscilla Telmo, Brazil/France, 2017)

This multi-platform project explores various forms of cinema, as well as various spiritual practices and trance forms around Brazil. Híbridos comprises four components: a feature-length film, a comprehensive open-source website, a multi-screen, site-specific installation, and a live cinema experience, in which the artists reconstruct the project from the source material in a dynamic presentation. Each form completes the other, in an attempt to question our relationship to images and to build an immersive, sensorial experience that evokes the trance state.

Monday, February 19, 7pm

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Feb
14
6:00 PM18:00

Special Screening of NOBODY'S WATCHING

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Nadie nos mira / Nobody's Watching (2017, 102 mins.)
Screening and Discussion

 

Julia Solomonoff’s third feature film is a portrait of the struggles of an Argentine actor trying to find his place in New York. The Guardian praised the film as an “acutely perceptive, achingly sad character study [that] deals in downgraded dreams and the brutal realities of trying to make it as an artist.”

Nadie nos mira (Nobody’s Watching) is the winner of Heineken Voces Development Grant at Tribeca Film Festival 2013, Proimágenes and Ibermedia Funds.

Solomonoff is a New York based Argentine filmmaker.  She is the writer/director of The Last Summer of la Boyita co-produced by Almodovar’s El Deseo, Epicentre Films and Travesia, winner of over twenty international awards.  Her first feature Hermanas(produced by Vanessa Ragone, Mariela Besuiesky and Walter Salles, developed at Sundance Writers’ Lab and Berlinale Talent Campus) opened at Toronto International Film Festival 2005 to critical acclaim. She is Visiting Assistant Arts Professor in Graduate Film at Tisch.

Post-screening discussion with the director moderated by Cinema Studies PhD student Tanya Goldman.

Free and open to the public.

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Feb
2
to Feb 4

2018 Edition of the Cinema Tropical Festival

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LA SOLEDAD
(Jorge Thielen Armand, Venezuela/Canada/Italy, 2016, 100 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)
Winner Best First Film – Cinema Tropical Awards
Co-presented with the Venezuelan Film Festival of New York (VEFFNY).

In a hypnotic blend of fiction and a documentary-like style, Jorge Thielen Armand looks beyond the headlines and gives a voice to those affected by contemporary Venezuela’s inner turmoil. La Soledad follows José, a young father who discovers that the dilapidated mansion he squats will soon be demolished. Desperate to save his family from homelessness, José embarks on a mystical search for a cursed treasure that is rumored to be buried in the house. Based on the filmmaker’s family and childhood home, most of the characters are played by his real friends and family members. Thielen Armand’s lyrical debut feature offers a poignant allegory of the desperate reality of today's Venezuela.
Friday, February 2, 7pm – Q&A with filmmaker

 

ADRIANA’S PACT
(El pacto de Adriana, Lissette Orozco. Chile, 2017, 96 min. New York premiere. In Spanish with English subtitles)
Special Jury Mention – Cinema Tropical Awards
Adriana was always director Lissette Orozco's favorite aunt. A confident woman who had settled in Australia, one day in 2007 she is suddenly arrested while visiting her family in Chile and accused of having worked for dictator Pinochet’s notorious secret police, DINA. As the aunt denies these accusations, her niece sets out to investigate Adriana’s history, managing the tough balancing act of maintaining her role as both niece and filmmaker. “Raw and compelling… a brave documentary” (Jay Weissberg, Variety), Lissette Orozco’s extremely personal debut feature is a riveting personal journey that serves as a timely account of lies and self-deception, both within a family and a nation.
Saturday, February 3, 2pm

 

MEMORIES OF A PENITENT HEART
(Cecilia Aldarondo. USA/Puerto Rico, 2016, 74 min. In English and Spanish with English subtitles)
Winner Best U.S. Latino Film – Cinema Tropical Awards
Combining a wealth of newly discovered home movies, video, and written documents with artfully shot contemporary interviews and vérité footage, Memories of a Penitent Heart is a documentary that cracks open a Pandora’s box of unresolved family drama. Originating from filmmaker Cecilia Aldarondo’s suspicion that there was something ugly in her family’s past, the film charts her excavation of the buried family conflict around her uncle Miguel’s death, and her search for Miguel’s partner Robert a generation later. After two years of dead ends, Robert turns up: but he is not the same man. He has reinvented himself as Father Aquin, a Franciscan monk with 25 years of pent-up grief and bitterness. For the first time, a member of Miguel’s family wants to hear Aquin’s side of the story—but is it too little, too late? A story about the mistakes of the past and the second chances of the present, Memories of a Penitent Heart is a cautionary tale about the unresolved conflicts wrought by AIDS, and a nuanced exploration of how faith is used and abused in times of crisis.
Saturday, February 3, 4pm – Q&A with filmmaker

 

ARABY
(Arábia, Affonso Uchoa, João Dumans. Brazil, 98 min. In Portuguese with English subtitles)
Winner, Best Film – Cinema Tropical Awards
Andre, a teenager, lives in an industrial town in Brazil near an old aluminum factory. One day, a factory worker, Cristiano, suffers an accident. Asked to go to Cristiano’s house to pick up clothes and documents, Andre stumbles upon a notebook, and it is here that Araby begins—or, rather, transforms. As Andre reads from the journal entries, we are plunged into Cristiano’s life, into stories of his wanderings, adventures, and loves. "An instant classic… [m]arked by boundless humanism" (Neil Young, The Hollywood Reporter) and beautifully written and filmed, Araby is a fable-like road movie about a young man who sets off on a twenty-year journey in search of a better life. A Grasshopper Film release.
Sunday, February 4, 3pm

 

THE HUMAN SURGE
(El auge del humano, Eduardo Williams. Argentina/Portugal/Brazil, 2016, 97 min. In Spanish, Portuguese and Cebuano with English subtitles)
Winner, Best Director – Cinema Tropical Awards
Buenos Aires. Exe, 25 years old, has just lost his job and is not looking for another one. His neighbors and friends seem as odd to him as they always have. Online, he meets Alf, a boy from Mozambique who is also bored with his job and who is about to follow Archie, another boy who has run away into the jungle. Through the dense vegetation of the forest, Archie tracks ants back to their nest. One of them wanders off course and comes across Chai, a Filipina who is sitting on a giant heap of earth and about to return to her strange, beautiful home town. The mysterious, humorous ways in which their adventures connect (or don’t) fuels The Human Surge, a film about our present moment that boldly and wildly looks towards our future. Winner of the top prize in the 2016 Locarno Film Festival’s Filmmakers of the Present section, William’s audacious debut feature has been hailed as “an exhilarating, boldly paradoxical experience” (Nick Pinkerton, Artforum). A Grasshopper Film release.
Sunday, February 4, 5pm

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Jan
29
7:15 PM19:15

New York Premiere of THE IDEA OF A LAKE

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THE IDEA OF A LAKE
(La idea de un lago, by Milagros Mumenthaler, Argentina/Switzerland, 2016, 82 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)

NYC PREMIERE!

Based on Guadalupe Gaona’s novel, POZO DE AIRE, Milagros Mumenthaler’s second feature delves deeper into the relationship of cinema with loss, memory, and youth. Inés, a photographer, is putting together a book of poems and images about her own past. In doing so, she finds her family dynamics shifting, as she and her mother and brother all come to terms with the absence of her father, who disappeared during the military dictatorship in Argentina. Mumenthaler moves away from the realm of naturalist representation in order to swim into the more obscure waters of artifice. The quest to make present what is absent suffuses the film and establishes Mumenthaler as one of the most interesting voices in contemporary Argentine cinema.

“The film explores the idea of memory on several different levels, and demonstrates how memories can be transformed by things that happen in the present. That’s really the core of the film – the intimate memories that we all have, but also the idea of memory as a civic and political right.” –Milagros Mumenthaler

This screening is part of: IF YOU CAN SCREEN IT THERE: PREMIERING CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN CINEMA

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Jan
14
to Jan 28

Back by Popular Demand! Elis Regina Biopic ELIS

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ELIS
(Hugo Prata, Brazil, 2016, 115 min. In Portuguese with English subtitles)

Back by popular demand!
January 14, 21 & 28 at 7:30pm

The life of Elis Regina, undoubtedly the greatest Brazilian singer of all time, is told in this biopic film with energetic and pulsating rhythm. Winner of eight awards at the 2017 Brazilian Academy of Cinema Awards, including Best Actress for Andréia Horta as Elis Regina. The film tells the story of the singer from her arrival in Rio de Janeiro at the age of 19 , her rise to success and national and international recognition, until her tragic and early death.

 
 

 

Co-presented with Symphony Space, sponsored by the Consulate General of Brazil in New York, with additional support from Boteco Social. Presented as part of Cinema Tropical's Music+Film: Brazil series.

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Jan
3
to Jan 16

NYC Theatrical Release of ANATOMY OF A MALE BALLET DANCER

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ANATOMY OF A MALE BALET DANCER
(David Barba and James Pellerito, USA, 2017, 83 min.)
A Retribution Media / Cinema Tropical release

Marcelo Gomes is a danceur noble: a male ballet dancer whose extraordinary technique, charismatic presence, and seemingly effortless strength make him the embodiment of the classical prince. Raised in Rio de Janeiro, the darkly handsome dancer, a principal with American Ballet Theatre since 2002, has been called the Pelé of Ballet. When not performing, rehearsing, or traveling the world as a guest artist, Gomes is at home in NYC’s Hell’s Kitchen, accompanied by Lua, his dachshund. He is a delight, whether candidly discussing the positive influence of a gay uncle while he was growing up, the joys of particular roles, or the vicissitudes of his devotion to classical dance. Includes ravishing clips of Gomes in Swan Lake, Don Quixote, Giselle, and La Bayadère.

“Engrossing. As much a portrait of a professional athlete as a performing artist. Gomes proves an engaging subject, whose dedication is as inspiring as the breathtaking grace and strength of his dancing. An intimate study...fluidly edited and shot with an excellent eye for both the exertion and the seeming effortlessness of the dance sequences.”
– David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter

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Dec
14
7:15 PM19:15

NYC Premiere of Roberto Doveris' LAS PLANTAS

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PLANTS
(Las plantas, Roberto Doveris, Chile, 2015, 93 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)

Roberto Doveris’ debut feature film revolves around Florencia, a 17-year-old girl responsible for the care of her comatose older brother during the summer. Trying to survive with limited means and no assistance, she becomes obsessed with a comic book called “Las Plantas,” which depicts an invasion of earth by sentient plants who take possession of human bodies every full moon. At the same time, Florencia is going through her own sexual awakening, meeting strangers through the internet, and her monotonous daily routine begins to merge with the fantasy world of the comics and her own burgeoning desires.

Winner of the Grand Jury Prize for Best Film at the Berlinale and associate-produced by Alicia Scherson (The FutureFamily Life), Plants is “a sexually souped-up teen psycho-thriller…an original coming-of-age tale laced with pop culture” (Variety).
 

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Nov
10
to Nov 30

NYC Theatrical Release of SANTA & ANDRÉS

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A film by Carlos Lechuga
(Cuba, 2016, 105 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)

Santa & Andrés takes place in the rural mountain region of Eastern Cuba where Andrés—a noncompliant gay writer in his fifties (played by Eduardo Martinez)—resides after he has been blacklisted by the government for having “ideological problems.” After a big event occurs someone reliable must be appointed to watch over him and make sure he does not get out and make any public political statement. Santa—a country girl in her thirties who works on a farm—is assigned to the task.

For three days in a row, Santa (played by Lola Amores) will sit in front of Andrés’ hut and keep watch on him. Santa and Andrés are as close as it gets to being true opposites and are not meant to like each other. What they cannot imagine, however, is that they have more things in common than they expect.

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Oct
27
to Nov 29

U.S. Theatrical Release of BRIMSTONE & GLORY

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BRIMSTONE & GLORY
Directed by Viktor Jakovlewski
(USA, 2017, 67 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)

The National Pyrotechnic Festival in Tultepec, Mexico is a site of festivity unlike any other in the world. In celebration of San Juan de Dios, patron saint of firework makers, conflagrant revelry engulfs the town for ten days. Artisans show off their technical virtuosity, up-and-comers create their own rowdy, lo-fi combustibles, and dozens of teams build larger-than- life papier-mâché bulls to parade into the town square, adorned with fireworks that blow up in all directions.

More than three quarters of Tultepec’s residents work in pyrotechnics, making the festival more than revelry for revelry’s sake. It is a celebration that anchors a way of life built around a generations-old, homegrown business of making fireworks by hand. For the people of Tultepec, the National Pyrotechnic Festival is explosive celebration, unrestrained delight and real peril. Plunging headlong into the fire, Brimstone & Glory honors the spirit of Tultepec’s community and celebrates celebration itself.

Edited by Affonso Gonçalves and scored by Dan Romer and Benh Zeitlin, the creative team of Beasts of the Southern Wild.

 

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Oct
25
7:00 PM19:00

U.S. Premiere of FELICIANO CENTURIÓN: HOLD ME TIGHT / AU NATUREL

  • The New School, Hoerle Lecture Hall (U L105), University Center. (map)
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FELICIANO CENTURIÓN: HOLD ME TIGHT / AU NATUREL
(Feliciano Centurión: Abrazo Íntimo al Natural, Mon Ross, Argentina/Paraguay, 2016, 63 min. In Spanish with English subtitles. U.S. Premiere).

Co-organized by Americas Society, Cinema Tropical and the Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts at The New School.

Free admission. Click here to RSVP.

Mon Ross' documentary film is an intimate portrait of the late Paraguayan artist Feliciano Centurión, who developed his career in Buenos Aires during the 80s and 90s. The film serves as an affective exercise with valuable archival material, as Feliciano, his work and his time are revisited through the memories of his Paraguayan and Argentine friends.

This film is presented in the context of Americas Society’s exhibition “José Leonilson: Empty Man.” (on view through February 3, 2018). Although there are no testimonies that the artists met in person, their works as well as their charismatic personalities share a similar sensibility.

 

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Oct
20
to Oct 26

NYC Theatrical Release of TEMPESTAD by Tatiana Huezo

  • Anthology Film Archives (map)
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TEMPESTAD
A film by Tatiana Huezo
(Mexico, 2016, 105 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)

Utilizing the direct testimony of two women whose lives have been torn apart by the cartel-fueled terror racking Mexico in the 21st century, Tatiana Huezo’s Tempestad is an impressionistic portrait—at once lyrical and shattering—of the human cost of the country’s lawlessness.

The first of the film’s protagonists, Miriam, remains haunted by the experience of finding herself arrested at her workplace and accused, without proof, of “people trafficking.” The violence she suffered and was exposed to during her imprisonment has left a profound gap in her life. Her story is counterpointed with that of Adela, who today works as a clown in a travelling circus. Ten years ago, her life too was irreversibly transformed; every night during the show, she evokes her missing daughter, Monica.

Mirror-like, Tempestad reflects the impact of the violence and impunity that afflict Mexico. Through these women’s voices, we are drawn into the heart of their feelings, steeped in loss and pain, but also love, dignity, and resistance. Though the two women’s stories have no direct connection to each other, Huezo’s exquisite visual style and the profound empathy of her approach weaves them together into a whole through which they resonate with and amplify each other.

"Tempestad sees these rough, modest lives imbued with compounded grief and possibilities —metaphysical, even—of transformation. The stories of these two women are far bigger than they may think they are." —Daniel Kasman, MUBI

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Oct
19
7:00 PM19:00

U.S. Premiere of JL'S PASSION About Brazilian Artist José Leonilson

  • The New School, Kellen Auditorium, Room N101, Sheila C. Johnson Design Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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JL'S PASSION
(A Paixão de JL, Carlos Nader, Brazil, 2015. In Portuguese with English subtitles. U.S. Premiere)

Co-organized by Americas Society, Cinema Tropical and the Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts at The New School.

Free admission. Click here to RSVP.

JL's Passion (A Paixao de JL) by Carlos Nader is a documentary about the Brazilian artist José Leonilson. In 1990, Leonilson began to record an audio diary on tape cassettes about his emotions, daily life, and events taking place in Brazil and around the world. Over time, the recordings came to hold a new urgency when Leonilson learns that he is HIV positive.

This film is presented in the context of Americas Society’s exhibition “José Leonilson: Empty Man.” (on view through February 3, 2018), the first U.S. solo exhibition of this key Brazilian artist. Focusing on Leonilson’s production as a mature artist, the show features approximately fifty paintings, drawings, and intimate embroideries made between the mid-1980s until 1993, when the artist died of AIDS.

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Oct
19
to Oct 22

Latino Films at the Margaret Mead Film Festival

  • American Museum of Natural History (map)
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Margaret Mead Film Festival

American Museum of Natural History
October 19-22

Latino films co-presented with Cinema Tropical

 BRIMSTONE & GLORY (Viktor Jakovleski, USA, 2017, 67 min. In Spanish with English subtitiles)  Once a year, an annual pyrotechnics festival erupts through the small city of Tultepec, Mexico, transforming it into a blaze of sparks and flames. In the climactic "burning of the bulls," the bravest participants run amid  toritos,  bull-shaped floats rigged with fireworks that rain burning ash and light on the city.    Opening night, Thursday, October 19, 7pm      

BRIMSTONE & GLORY
(Viktor Jakovleski, USA, 2017, 67 min. In Spanish with English subtitiles)

Once a year, an annual pyrotechnics festival erupts through the small city of Tultepec, Mexico, transforming it into a blaze of sparks and flames. In the climactic "burning of the bulls," the bravest participants run amid toritos, bull-shaped floats rigged with fireworks that rain burning ash and light on the city.

Opening night, Thursday, October 19, 7pm

 

  THE CLOUD FOREST  (Bosque de niebla, Mónica Álvarez Franco, Mexico, 2016, 91 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)  New York Premiere / Director in Attendance   Sometimes, ordinary people can sometimes create extraordinary positive change. In a small community in the Mexican tropics, sixteen families redesign their lives to create an entirely self-sustaining and independent society, hoping to save their sacred and fog-laden land.  The Cloud Forest  weaves this community's singular quest with gorgeous scenes of their endangered surroundings.    Sunday, October 22, 2:30pm     

THE CLOUD FOREST
(Bosque de niebla, Mónica Álvarez Franco, Mexico, 2016, 91 min. In Spanish with English subtitles)
New York Premiere / Director in Attendance

Sometimes, ordinary people can sometimes create extraordinary positive change. In a small community in the Mexican tropics, sixteen families redesign their lives to create an entirely self-sustaining and independent society, hoping to save their sacred and fog-laden land. The Cloud Forest weaves this community's singular quest with gorgeous scenes of their endangered surroundings.

Sunday, October 22, 2:30pm

 

  DICK VERDULT - IT IS TRUE BUT NOT HERE  (Luuk Bouwman, Netherlands, 2017, 70 min.)  U.S. Premiere / Director in Attendance   Dick Verdult is a shape-shifting, multifaceted artist, and musician. He was born in the Netherlands, grew up in Guatemala, and studied film in Paris in the aftermath of the ’68 student revolts. His diversity of experience has led him to create art that defies categorization. Whimsical, elusive, and unshakably cheerful, Verdult has forged a path for himself that inspires and delights at every turn.   Friday, October 20, 6:30pm    

DICK VERDULT - IT IS TRUE BUT NOT HERE
(Luuk Bouwman, Netherlands, 2017, 70 min.)
U.S. Premiere / Director in Attendance

Dick Verdult is a shape-shifting, multifaceted artist, and musician. He was born in the Netherlands, grew up in Guatemala, and studied film in Paris in the aftermath of the ’68 student revolts. His diversity of experience has led him to create art that defies categorization. Whimsical, elusive, and unshakably cheerful, Verdult has forged a path for himself that inspires and delights at every turn.

Friday, October 20, 6:30pm

 

  BRASÍLIA: LIFE AFTER DESIGN  (Bart Simpson, Canada/UK, 2017, 88 min.)  U.S. Premiere / Director in Attendance   Brasília is a bold urban experiment and a city unlike any other. Conceived in 1956 on an uninhabited site in the geographic center of Brazil, the city was intended to be a fresh start for the new political order, free from the messy colonial baggage of the previous capital, Rio de Janeiro. This atmospheric tribute to the sights and sounds of Bras í lia’s large-scale modernist achievement pans across urban vistas and images of city dwellers moving through the enormous spaces between buildings.    Saturday, October 21,  8pm      

BRASÍLIA: LIFE AFTER DESIGN
(Bart Simpson, Canada/UK, 2017, 88 min.)
U.S. Premiere / Director in Attendance

Brasília is a bold urban experiment and a city unlike any other. Conceived in 1956 on an uninhabited site in the geographic center of Brazil, the city was intended to be a fresh start for the new political order, free from the messy colonial baggage of the previous capital, Rio de Janeiro. This atmospheric tribute to the sights and sounds of Brasília’s large-scale modernist achievement pans across urban vistas and images of city dwellers moving through the enormous spaces between buildings.

Saturday, October 21,  8pm

 

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Oct
16
7:30 PM19:30

Special Benefit Screening of MALA MALA

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MALA MALA
(Dan Sickles and Antonio Santini, USA/Puerto Rico, 2015, 87 min. In Spanish and English with English subtitles)

Special Benefit Screening – All Ticket Sales Go to Support Hurricane Relief Efforts in Puerto Rico

Cinema Tropical and IFC Center presents a special encore benefit screening of this critically acclaimed documentary, which had its theatrical premiere at the theater in July 2015.

Mala Mala explores the intimate moments, performances, friendships and activism of trans identifying people, drag queens and others who defy typical gender identities in Puerto Rico. The film features Ivana, an activist; Soraya, an older sex-change pioneer; Sandy, a prostitute looking to make a change; and Samantha and Paxx, both of whom struggle with the quality of medical resources available to assist in their transition.

Hailed as “Sensitive and thoughtful” by the New York Times and an audience favorite at the Tribeca Film Festival, Mala Mala affirms that the quest to find oneself can be both difficult and beautiful.

All ticket sales from the October 16 screening will support hurricane relief efforts in Puerto Rico, via donations to the Hispanic Federation, the Centro Communitario LGBTT de Puerto Rico (including work by Ivana Fred, one of the activists featured in MALA MALA), Museo de Arte Contemporaneo (MAC) / Artist Emergency Fund and other organizations.

Screening introduced by Cinema Tropical board member Warren James, a Puerto Rican architect based in New York City and principal of the firm Warren A. James Architecture + Planning, and Puerto Rican documentary filmmaker Carmen Oquendo, in NYC on a family medical visit after surviving Hurricane Maria and witnessing the aftermath.

Special thanks to Strand Releasing, distributor of MALA MALA, for making this screening possible.

Please also consider making a donation directly to the Hispanic Federation’s relief efforts in Puerto Rico

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Oct
12
7:15 PM19:15

U.S. Premiere of ABOUT 12 by Martín Shanly - Q&A With Director

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ABOUT 12
(Juana a los 12, Martín Shanly, Argentina, 2014, 80 min. In English and Spanish with English subtitles)

U.S. Premiere - Q&A with director

The problem facing Juana, a 12-year-old girl, is imperceptible to others. She might even be even unaware of it herself, but it is latent in every shot of Martín Shanly’s debut feature: Juana fails easily. She performs poorly at her private British school in the outskirts of Buenos Aires and even worse in her social life among friends and family. 

About 12 nurtures a rare bitterness in its particular mixture of uncomfortable comedy and tempered tragedy. In the depiction of female bodies out-of-sync with the world they inhabit, Shanly’s film successfully blooms as an odd cousin to Todd Haynes’s Safe and Todd Solondz’s Welcome to the Dollhouse. The lead performance by Rosario Shanly—the director’s sister—transcends masks thanks to a mise-en-scène that manages to be as frail and mysterious as its main character. Juana’s inadequacy to deal with the most basic social rules turns her apparently passive behavior into an intimate revolutionary act, a silent cry of resistance that is both funny and piercing. Juana is a gentle girl, a soul maybe too beautiful for this world.

“It is not a plain attitude that I find in Juana’s character, but a buffoonish darkness whose natural mask is the smile, or simply laughter, usually untimely, that transfigures (and makes much more interesting) the luminosity of her face. A smile that becomes vampiric.”
—Nuria Silva, Hacerse la crítica

Thursday, October 12 at 7:15pm

Presented as part This screening is part of If You Can Screen It There: Premiering Contemporary Latin American Cinema.

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Oct
4
to Oct 26

U.S. Release of CHAVELA

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(Catherine Gund and Daresha Kyi, USA/Mexico/Spain, 2017, 93 min. In English and Spanish with English subtitles) 

Chavela Vargas (1919 – 2012): “A trailblazing free spirit whose appetite for tequila and women was as legendary as her soul-stirring vocals…  A hard-drinking rebel who shredded the prevailing stereotype of the fem and flirty, hip-swinging señorita in Mexican popular music, the singer commands the stage in passionate performances throughout Chavela, owning a trademark androgynous look…that made her a queer icon long before she openly defined herself as a lesbian at age 81… singing deeply felt songs of pain, solitude and lost love in a voice both rough and tender. A queer icon long before she openly defined herself a lesbian at age 81.” – David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter.

Featuring Pedro Almodovar, who used Chavela’s music in his films (KikaThe Flower of My Secret, Julieta) and introduced her to international concert audiences in the 1990s, when, as her manager notes, she tried as hard as she could to die on stage.

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