Indocumentales Presents FREE LIKE THE BIRDS and SIN PAÍS

  • King Juan Carlos Center Auditorium at NYU 53 Washington Square South New York, NY, 10012 United States

On the second installment of the Indocumentales series, we feature two short films that highlight the impact of deportations on families followed by a conversation about the role of filmmaking and activism featuring Paola Mendoza and Theo Rigby.

Indocumentales is a film and conversation series exploring the immigrant experience. This series is presented in partnership with Cinema Tropical, and What Moves You?, and brings together educators, filmmakers, community activists, and the general public in conversation about current issues related to migration and inspired by groundbreaking films.

About the films:

FREE LIKE THE BIRDS
(Paola Mendoza, USA, 2016, 10 min. In In Spanish and English with English subtitles)
Six year old, Sophie Cruz, took the world by storm when she broke through the police barricades in Washington DC to give the Pope a letter. Her letter asked the Pope to convince President Obama and Congress to pass immigration reform. In that moment    Sophie became an Internet sensation. Free like the Birds is the intimate story her family fighting against the looming threat of deportation. Sophie is at the center of her family’s plight and that of millions of children like her. Through her innocence, her laughter and    through her understanding of what it means to be an immigrant and an American, we bear witness to her family striving for the American Dream.

SIN PAÍS / WITHOUT A COUNTRY
(Theo Rigby, USA, 2010 21 min. In Spanish and English with English subtitles)
In 1992, Sam and Elida Mejia left Guatemala during a violent civil war and brought their one-year old son, Gilbert, to California. The Mejia’s settled in the Bay Area, and for the past 17 years they have worked multiple jobs to support their family, paid their taxes, and saved enough to buy a home. They had two more children, Helen and Dulce, who are both U.S. citizens. Two years ago, immigration agents stormed the Mejia’s house looking for someone who didn’t live there. Sam, Elida, and Gilbert were all undocumented and became deeply entangled in the U.S. immigration system. Sin País begins two weeks before Sam and Elida’s scheduled deportation date. After a passionate fight to keep the family together, Sam and Elida are deported and take Dulce with them back to Guatemala. With intimate access and striking imagery, the Student Academy Award winner Sin País explores the complexities of the Mejia’s new reality of a separated family–parents without their children, and children without their parents.

This event is free and open to the public. ID is required to enter the building